Executive Director/Co-founder

Cameron Sinclair
Cameron Sinclair speaking at the Art Center Design Conference in 2004

Cameron Sinclair
Executive Director/Co-founder
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Sinclair was trained as an architect at the University of Westminster and at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. During his studies Sinclair developed an interest in social, cultural and humanitarian design. His postgraduate thesis focused on providing shelter to New York's homeless through sustainable, transitional housing. After his studies, he moved to New York where he worked as a designer and project architect.

In 1999 Sinclair co-founded Architecture for Humanity, which seeks architectural solutions to humanitarian crises and brings design services to communities in need. Currently the organization is working in a dozen countries on projects ranging from health centers in Sub-Saharan Africa, community centers in Southeast Asia to low-income housing on the Gulf Coast of the United States. In 2007 Architecture for Humanity launched the Open Architecture Network, the worlds' first online community dedicated to improving living conditions through innovative and sustainable design.

Sinclair and Architecture for Humanity co-founder Kate Stohr compiled the first ever compendium on socially conscious design titled Design Like You Give A Damn: Architectural Responses to Humanitarian Crises.

He has taught at the University of Minnesota and Montana State University and lectures regularly at schools in the United States and abroad. He has spoken at a number of international business and design conferences on sustainable development and post-disaster reconstruction, including guest appearances on BBC World Service and CNN International, National Public Radio and PBS.

In addition Sinclair is a member of the Japan Society Innovators project and serves on the advisory boards of the Acumen Fund, Detroit Collaborative Design Center and the Institute for State Effectiveness.

Sinclair was named as one of three winners of the 2006 TED Prize, which honors visionaries from any field who have shown they can "positively impact life on this planet".
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